A trip to Tommy’s baby hospital

September 16, 2011 at 9:07 am | Posted in Daily Life, Huggies Mums | 8 Comments
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Tommy's Baby

During the summer I visited Guy’s & St Thomas’ Hospital in London with Huggies, the lovely Heather from Young & Younger, and a number of other media folk.
We met with Annette Briley – Consultant Midwife, and Professor Shennan, who told us about the incredible work and research carried out at the hospital for premature, still birth and miscarriage.

This is the amazing part – they are able to test an expectant mother and calculate when she is likely to give birth. This means that if there is a risk of a baby being born very early, they can plan ahead and take the necessary precautions.

For mothers who have tragically lost premature babies and are pregnant again, this work is absolutely invaluable.

St Thomas’s Hospital has the largest research facility of its kind in Europe and much of its work is funded by the charity Tommy’s.

Most people don’t realise premature birth is so common unless they’ve experienced it directly, yet annually it costs the NHS £2.9 billion, not much less than smoking at £3.3 billion which I found absolutely unbelievable.

The definition of a pre term baby is a baby born before 37 weeks. Which puts bear, our son who was born it that category as he was born at 36 weeks. He was a happy and healthy baby – despite being day glow yellow!

We were told though about a mother who lost her baby at 27 weeks. However the research helped them to predict when she would have her next child during her pregnancy, and under the care of St Thomas’ she delivered a healthy baby at 26 weeks weighing a tiny 1lb 9oz who is now doing really well.

The aim is to reach out to women affected by premature birth to continue their research and further develop their understanding. Another area which remains a mystery is pre-eclampsyia, the causes of which are really not known.

Anyone from anywhere in the country can visit St Thomas’s for their help and support and they also have a help line manned by trained midwives.

The work they do is truly incredible – inspiring and humbling. So if you ever see a collection for Tommy’s remember what an amazing cause they are fundraising for.

Every day in England and Wales alone, around 290 women experience a miscarriage, approximately 149 babies are born prematurely and 10 babies are stillborn.

1 in 4 women experience complications during pregnancy.  It really isn’t until you are affected that you understand the incredible heart break and pain that it can cause.  If you have a spare £1 in your pocket, this is a good place to send it.

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8 Comments »

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  1. That’s amazing that they can predict that, hopefully saving lots of babies.
    Those eyelashes on the mask are so cute….
    I had a very yellow baby too….he was 12 days late though
    x

    • I didn’t know babies could be jaundice if they were late, you learn something new every day! x

      • you certainly do….I just thought he had a lovely tan…..in March!!

  2. oh wow, I didn’t know any of that. That’s amazing work!

  3. I didnt realise premature birth was this common! I hope more people help with this charity!!

    • I know, it’s incredible isn’t it, and the work they do is amazing

  4. My first daughter was 5 weeks early and spent 12 days in SCBU. We were the lucky ones and came home with a healthy child. There were other families in there with us who weren’t so lucky. The work Tommy’s do is invaluable!!!

    • It’s scary isn’t it, when you glimpse inside that world. Glad your little one is well xx


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